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The power of love

When I received an E-mail from Father Alistair asking members of the pastoral team to contribute articles for the church website I secretly hoped that by the time my turn came the lockdown would be over and we would be back in church. Yet still we are not.


I have been thinking, just as Father Alistair himself has said, that this is what happens when one has too much time on one’s hands. And, the more I think, the more I’m baffled how we humans can be so advanced in terms of science and technology yet have still to find a cure or vaccine for Covid-19. Meanwhile the world is on its knees. It’s no secret that many people don’t go to church or believe in God. Is this His way of saying to us: “I have given you free will to live, but you have forgotten Me”?


My sister recently sent me a video clip that includes a quotation attributed to Albert Einstein, writing in 1938. It struck a chord with me, especially the following extract:


There is an extremely powerful force that, so far, science has not found a formal explanation to. It is a force that includes and governs all others, and is even behind any phenomenon operating in the universe and has not yet been identified by us. This universal force is LOVE.

When scientists looked for a unified theory of the universe they forgot the most powerful unseen force. Love is light, that enlightens those who give and receive it. Love is gravity, because it makes some people feel attracted to others. Love is power, because it multiplies the best we have, and allows humanity not to be extinguished in their blind selfishness. Love unfolds and reveals. For love we live and die. Love is God and God is Love.


Something to think about over the coming days.


Jesus said: “I give you a new command: you must love the Lord your God with all your heart, with all your soul, with all your mind and with all your strength. The second is: love your neighbour as yourself” (Mark 12:30-31). Yet if we fail to love our Lord as he asked, how can we even start to love our neighbours? Are all the bad things happening in the world a consequence of this failure to love?


Like all of you, I’m sure, I’m looking forward to a time when we can move freely again, go to church and to work and meet up with friends. (My two sons, who are currently working from our home, say they are longing for the end of the lockdown so that they can engage in intellectual conversations and enjoy better company!) But for now we must enjoy our God-given free time. We may never have the chance again.


Keep safe,

Ralph

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